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#21 [url]

Oct 8 10 12:18 PM

Yes, the puff and slash is very nationalistic. Woodcuts from the period are styalised by clothing so you can tell the different nationalities appart.

But if you are aiming for the fantasy market as well (fitting in with the Empire in Warhammer I dare say) Lansknechts are a good way forward.

The issue with the pose though is that although it looks pretty, but having them at the charge is a pain in the arse when gaming as you can not move them in to base to base contact as a result.

Redoubt Miniatures had a great display piece they had at shows showing the ranks going back with low charge, mid charge and high charge.

Without so much as a damn your eyes www.16ld.org

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#22 [url]

Oct 8 10 3:45 PM

I think that historical nitpicks surely want to have some sort of time period pinned down. Or at least having the chosen style specifically illustrated with a couple of pictures.

-griefbringer

Considering that there is no uniform style of dress in Renaissance armies, nor any definite evidence as to what dress would be favoured by what troops at what time (the only clear difference between the Landsknechts and the Reislaufers being the Landsknecht's universal use of the katzblager), I'd say you can't really validly nitpick that much.

Alexander Hunt. Co-author of the Warhammer Fantasy: Total Realism project. Author of Defiance: The realistic modern and future skirmish ruleset.

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#23 [url]

Oct 8 10 5:25 PM

Seriously I would go with not too elaborate dress here. The more gorish garments were mainly worn by Landsknechts and later Swiss (post Marignano), and tended to change (like the trouser style). If we take these back a bit they could work a bit longer in the timeframe, work for parts of the Italian, French or Spanish foot (probably even some peasant wars) and they wil still be able to fill the poorer ranks of the high time regiments.
On another note, the more garish slashings in the cloth are hard to make with plastic moulds.

With the new minisprues coming, we should perhaps suggest just one or two bodies of standing pike (to fill the backranks of larger units, with a collection of seperate heads (different feather styles over the years) and seperate sword/dagger. The pike has to be provided from another sprue.

Then lets see how it sells. If it does, other bodies & head can then be added gradually changing the style, until all armies from the Swiss and first Landsknechts after the Burgundian wars up to around 1550 can be fielded, using a mix of existing bodies and heads.  Front rank minis could be left for companies producing metals or added later, though I would rather have marching and advancing poses in formation for bulk.

Here for some inspirational miniatures:
http://www.brother-vinni.com/gallery/28_ren01.htm

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#24 [url]

Oct 9 10 8:36 AM


Considering that there is no uniform style of dress in Renaissance armies, nor any definite evidence as to what dress would be favoured by what troops at what time (the only clear difference between the Landsknechts and the Reislaufers being the Landsknecht's universal use of the katzblager), I'd say you can't really validly nitpick that much.

-ferocity

Even amongst the Landsknechts there is an indication of the development of the style of clothing. See for example Medieval Military Costume (Gerry Embleton, 2000, Crowood Press, Europa Militaria Special No8) pages 88-91 to see how their styles changed in the period 1500-1525. And by 1550's the styles had changed even more, with pluderhosen, baggy trousers, ruffs and various other Spanish influences in evidence.

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