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gwedd

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Posts: 246

#21 [url]

Jul 2 09 6:29 AM


  Now see, I prefer the "at rest/at ease" poses to the combat poses. 

  respects,

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#23 [url]

Jul 3 09 1:58 AM

Well how possible would it be to create a sprue of corinthian helmets, Hoplon shields, and spears and short swords.. pretty much like the numidian upgrade for ancient infantry but different type of helmet.. Not to mention that the Hoplite form of battle was inherentlly diffrent from the Phalanx type of battle, Hoplites used shorter spears, and thrusted over them, rather then the Phalanx which had the Shiled tied to ones arm in order to use the large pike they had.

Hoplites = Pre Phalanx, still around after the phalanx formation took over, but mostlly used for the Elite troops in Ancient Greek armies


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#25 [url]

Jul 3 09 11:51 AM

Corinthian helmet


Originated in ancient Greece and taking its name from the area of Corinth, the Corinthian helmet (Ancient Greek κόρυς κορινθίη, Modern κράνος κορινθιακό) was a type[1] of bronze helmet which in its later styles covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth. A large curved projection protected the nape of the neck, similar to those seen on later Roman and conquistador helmets and the German Stahlhelm. Out of combat, a Greek hoplite would wear the helmet tipped upward for comfort.


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#28 [url]

Jul 4 09 1:59 AM

Not to mention that the Hoplite form of battle was inherentlly diffrent from the Phalanx type of battle, Hoplites used shorter spears, and thrusted over them, rather then the Phalanx which had the Shiled tied to ones arm in order to use the large pike they had.

-comrade87

This sounds like a much narrower definition of a phalanx than I am used to seeing.

Griefbringer

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#29 [url]

Jul 4 09 3:24 AM

Hey, that's a cool helmet!
Maybe we could give it goggles and a respirator and suggest it for the Sci Fi greatcoats!
I bet that would provide another 5-6 pages of dispute right there!

-howardwhitehouse

Your wit once again defeats me howard.. damn it, everytime

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#30 [url]

Jul 4 09 4:53 AM

Definitely one of the reasons I LOVE Hoplites.  I just can't wait until these are made!

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#32 [url]

Jul 13 09 6:30 AM

I was just looking at the sprue description again.  The originator wants separate arms, but I was thinking that the shield arm would be attached, as these are most likely going to be in phalanx formation.  A choice of overarm and underarm thrusting poses, plus some "at ease/at the ready" poses would be perfect for this sprue.  What are other peoples thought on this?  I'm actually putting in for some more sprues, so I can make proper phalanxes.

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#34 [url]

Jul 13 09 8:33 PM

Gasmasks?!?

-sierra19

Of course - for the Stosstruppen Hoplites!

"Don't try to make babies with your own roleplay character - it always ends in pain & shame" - Advice I never thought I'd have to give once, let alone TWICE!!

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#35 [url]

Jul 14 09 3:03 AM

Actually, there was recently an article somewhere about the early chemical warfare methods employed in the ancient times in a siege - somewhere in the Roman-Parthian border.

Griefbringer

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#36 [url]

Aug 18 09 1:44 AM

I was thinking about an army from Aigina which if i'm not mistaking was an enemy of athens
but don't know what symbol they used on there shields.

but I'm intrested.


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#37 [url]

Aug 21 09 3:20 AM

that does surprise me, I know that in the middleages they shot carcasses over the wall to start all kinds of diseasses
so it wouldn't surprise me if the ancients did have some kind of claypot with some chemicals that reacted and released somekind of fume. which if inhaled would at least impare if not kill you.

but gasmasks for hoplites ?  get real.

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#38 [url]

Aug 22 09 7:44 PM

Mmmm Byzantium Greek Fire Throwers are awesome in Medieval 2 total war. Anyways on topic I thought the phalanx formation didnt get popular until alexander so wouldnt classical greek hoplites be in different formations?

Where is his will needed?

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#39 [url]

Aug 23 09 12:07 AM

Classical Greek hoplites definitely fought in a phalanx centuries before Alexander showed up. What the Macedonians popularised was the usage of a pike (sarissa) as the phalanx armament instead of the spear.

As for the Byzantine fire siphons, my understanding is that those were not particularly practical in land warfare (regardless of what some wargame designers might think), but could be quite handy when mounted on a ship and employed with care.

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#40 [url]

Aug 23 09 3:11 AM

Didn't Alexander's dad Phillip develop the phalanx?


"Don't try to make babies with your own roleplay character - it always ends in pain & shame" - Advice I never thought I'd have to give once, let alone TWICE!!

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